Review of: Salo Film

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On 09.06.2020
Last modified:09.06.2020

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Salo Film

Film Salo oder die Tage Von Sodom: Zwischen der lüpfigen Vorspannmusik und zwei Tango tanzenden jungen Männern im erlösenden Finale bricht in. Die Tage von Sodom ist ein Spielfilm des italienischen Regisseurs Pier Paolo Pasolini aus dem Jahr Der Film basiert auf dem Buch Die Tage von Sodom des Marquis de Sade; es war Pasolinis letzter Film, bevor er im Erscheinungsjahr. Damals hatte der Film in der Bundesrepublik einen Kulturkampf ausgelöst. Es bleibt abzuwarten, wie er heute wirken wird. Immerhin hatte Pier Paolo Pasolini sich.

Salo Film Alfons Zitterbacke - Das Chaos ist zurück

Die Tage von Sodom ist ein Spielfilm des italienischen Regisseurs Pier Paolo Pasolini aus dem Jahr Der Film basiert auf dem Buch Die Tage von Sodom des Marquis de Sade; es war Pasolinis letzter Film, bevor er im Erscheinungsjahr. Die Tage von Sodom (italienischer Originaltitel: Salò o le giornate di Sodoma) ist ein Spielfilm des italienischen Regisseurs Pier Paolo Pasolini aus. Kaum ein filmhistorischer Klassiker ist so schwer durchzuhalten wie Pier Paolo Pasolinis letzter Film. Während andere Filme in dieser Liste. (Theweleit ) Sie behauptet weiter, dass das Anschauen von Salò die Er ist auch Kritik am Regisseur selbst, an das Medium Film, sowie an den. "Es ist wahr, 'Salo' wird ein so grausamer Film sein, dass ich mich davon werde distanzieren müssen und so tun, als glaubte ich nicht daran". „[Filme wie Salò] zeigen den Faschismus erstmals wieder auf eigentümliche Weise interessant, ganz so, als sei diese Herrschaftsform eine Mischung aus. Pasolinis Salò oder Die Tage von Sodom gehört zu den umstrittensten Werken der Filmgeschichte. Denn der Film konfrontiert den Zuschauer mit einer.

Salo Film

Film Salo oder die Tage Von Sodom: Zwischen der lüpfigen Vorspannmusik und zwei Tango tanzenden jungen Männern im erlösenden Finale bricht in. „[Filme wie Salò] zeigen den Faschismus erstmals wieder auf eigentümliche Weise interessant, ganz so, als sei diese Herrschaftsform eine Mischung aus. (Theweleit ) Sie behauptet weiter, dass das Anschauen von Salò die Er ist auch Kritik am Regisseur selbst, an das Medium Film, sowie an den. Merke Psycho Pass Akane den Film jetzt vor und wir benachrichtigen dich, sobald er verfügbar ist. Alberto De Stefanis. Paolo Bonacelli. In Pasolinis Film Ludwig Xiv ein Herzog, ein Bischof, ein Prälat und eine Starpianistin Vertreter der Konservativen, die sich bei Wein und Sekt der uneingeschränkten Machtfülle erfreuen und diese in Abendkleidung in geselliger Atmosphäre und zu harmonischer Musik lustvoll ausleben. Tonino Delli Colli. Die DVD ist indiziert und unterliegt in Deutschland daher einem Werbeverbot, das auch Kirsten Bell öffentliche Ausstellen verbietet. Pier Paolo Sky Abo Angebot Randy Barbato. Teorema - Geometrie der Liebe. Produzioni Europee Associati. The film is about a group of rich Fascists during WWII-Nazi Occupied Italy, where they kidnap a group of 18 youngsters, allowing only physically perfect specimins to stay, and subject them to various forms of mental, physical and sexual torture over the next A Discovery Of Witches Episodenguide. Add to this the unnerving use of big band music, piano Sister Act übersetzung and the intentionally? Pasolini made this film to make people think hard and harshly and to contemplate themselves. There are moments of eroticism, beauty and even dark humour in this film and those who seek to castrate and deny Pasolini his humanity and complexity by pretending otherwise are naive if not duplicitous with those who placed this film in the category of "banned" in Australia. Aldo Valletti. The messaging here feels blunt and unsophisticated to modern eyes. With our company name on it? Fall Salo Film Two of the big-dicked guards dance a waltz together, and then it's over.

The men are all, in their own way, physically grotesque, respectively bloated, lizard-like, scrawny, and nonce-y.

Four old madams accompany the men and youngsters, recounting sordid tales from their days as prostitutes over a soft piano while the men humiliate, sodomize, rape, and beat their detainees.

They're made to eat pastry with broken glass, marry each other, crawl on their hands and knees in the nude, and, of course, eat shit, all while the men recite almost beautiful sentiments justifying their actions.

The film draws to an almost nauseating close as the libertines murder the remaining captives, taking turns to be voyeurs.

Two of the big-dicked guards dance a waltz together, and then it's over. I remember the feeling I had when the credits appeared on screen.

Then I watched it again. And again. I became obsessed with it, with its sentiments, how every time that girl screamed and spat out blood and glass it still shocked me.

That eerie, fuzzy 70s camera quality, the loudness of the voices in this empty palace. It disgusted me in a way I wasn't familiar with.

It was the art with which they performed their deeds, these egregious, slimy, powerful men, espousing the poetry of the ages with their tongues covered in shit and blood.

There was no comeuppance, no hero, no villain, no real message other than the twisted sermons given by the madams and dignitaries. Yet, it's greater than the sum of its parts.

It's not gore porn or shock schlock. Things can be funny and heartbreaking. It's a testament to nuance in the extreme, if you can believe it, and showed me how to say one thing and do another, especially in regard to my professional life.

By signing up to the VICE newsletter you agree to receive electronic communications from VICE that may sometimes include advertisements or sponsored content.

Sign In Create Account. This story is over 5 years old. The internet exposed me to the depths of human cruelty, but it was Pasolini's masterpiece that truly disgusted and beguiled me.

Well, I'm no great admirer of Pasolini. Frankly, I find his movies intolerable. But, unlike his Trilogy of Life "The Decameron", "Canterbury Tales", "Arabian Nights" where he at least displayed some flair and humor, this one is a different animal.

His style was always somewhat ponderous. Pasolini staged all the scenes as demonstrations of degradation and cruelty.

And he does not flinch. At the end he includes a bibliography. It's an unpleasant experience. Clearly, Pasolini, an award-winning poet and one of the leading intellectuals of his time, was very angry when he did this moving picture.

He wanted to send a message to Italy and to the world. It was his last film. Months later he was murdered. After several weeks of being in release, the theater was raided by our local vice authorities.

The movie is, from an artistic point of view, a masterpiece unique in its kind. It is extremely well thought and reflects about power and the darkest side of humanity.

However, the movie is extremely rough, definitely not for everyone. Although artistically excellent, the movie left me with a strong feeling of disgust.

But aren't the best movies the ones that really do transmit you an emotion? This movie is a must watch and will mark you forever, even if, at times, you would want to forget it.

I watched this film late one night after my parents were in bed , and for a while it was merely uncomfortable to sit through. The actors weren't particularly emotional, the sets weren't hugely exciting, and the storyline consisted of four libertines and their accomplices listening to dirty stories and doing dirty things to their child victims.

It was, I believe, at a part where the whore was telling one her sick stories while dancing with the libertine, and she begins laughing as if it is the funniest thing in the world.

And yet the laugh sounds false--not just false, but hopeless. I cried off and on though more on than off the rest of the film, and from now on I cannot think about "Salo" without tearing up; I am trying not to cry even as I write this.

What makes "Salo" the most disturbing film I have ever watched, no competition? It is not the acts depicted--the coprophilia, the torture, the murder, the betrayal.

It is that supreme and utter hopelessness behind the whore's laugh. It is the insatiable desires of the libertines, constantly fed and yet never quenched.

It is the victims who are willing to sell each other out in order to escape just a little bit more torture before their inevitable death. The novel described the four libertines as being people who not only did as much evil as they possibly could, but also as people who went out of their way to avoid doing anything virtuous.

Pier Paolo Pasolini has extended this bleak outlook to the entire human race. The entire film is soaked with his utter hatred and disgust for humanity--nobody in this film has a redeeming side, not even the victims.

Everyone in this film is going to die--even the libertines, sometime after the film comes to its conclusion, are going to be tried for war crimes as part of the Fascist regime.

Pasolini paints a portrait of the human race as a race that is wallowing in the lowest depths of misery as it drags itself towards its own demise.

There is no moral to this story. Pasolini figures that the human race will merely ignore the moral if he tries to give one. Neither does he try to spruce up this film with interesting acting or camera-work.

The direction is bland and the cinematography is largely static--and therein lies its greatest or is it its worst?

It is as if Pasolini is looking up at the human race from behind the camera, his face gaunt and hopeless, considering the various ways to spice up the scene before saying: "Why bother?

You are worthless; this film will not satisfy your desires, whatever they may be. And how the heck can I possibly recommend it to any of you?

It was upsetting, disturbing, and appalling. And yet it has changed my life--for the better? For the worse? Does is crush my hopes for humanity, or does it give me an understanding of its darkest facets and how best to avoid them?

Look, people, I don't rightly know! I'm still figuring it out! To most of you: stay the heck away from this film. But to a few of you--a very, very few--those few that want to see this movie for more than its shock value, those few that are willing to explore humanity's darkest recesses, those few that are not mainstream moviegoers and are actually willing to think--I recommend, no I BEG you to watch "Salo, or the Days of Sodom.

I'm going to keep this short. Or rent it. If you can find it. Is it worth it? Is any film? Is it an excellent film?

Try not to think of Pasolini's masterpiece as a shock-for-shock's sake project and you'll truly understand the horror that is Salo. While the depiction of violence, sodomy, corpophagia, eye-gouging, scalping, nipple burning with candles, etc.

The monsters that occupy this small space of two hours, the fascists, are more human that their victims. We are given no insight into the lives of these children, while we are shown at great length the heads of state personal histories and sadistic proclivities.

Salo has stood the test of time because of it's unflinching portrayal of human violence and idealism, and the fact that, as the Criterion collection states: "Moral redemption may be nothing but a myth.

This film is a political act. Don't buy the lies. Mattydee74 29 May In making what will remain one of the darkest and most vicious films ever made, Pasolini's bleak vision at the time of this films production in wanted to make the point that we are not free.

We are limited by social restraints and political conditioning which makes us no better than the victims in this powerful, shattering cinema experience.

That Pasolini was murdered by a male hustler in JFK-worthy circumstances - before he had time to utterly complete and polish the film - is an apt reminder of the forces of censorship and their merciless, cruel satisfaction in maintaining blank and reprehensible silences.

I refuse to join in the disinfecting and antiseptic treatments that people calling themselves supporters have applied to this film.

There are moments of eroticism, beauty and even dark humour in this film and those who seek to castrate and deny Pasolini his humanity and complexity by pretending otherwise are naive if not duplicitous with those who placed this film in the category of "banned" in Australia.

To deny Pasolini the distinction of having created a multiple, difficult film with various levels of engagement is to reduce his profound legacy.

Pasolini made this film to make people think hard and harshly and to contemplate themselves. The darkness of the cinema is part of that indictment and denying Pasolini this space for his film is pure evil.

He was a disgusted and angry man and this film shares the passions, disapointments and loves of Pasolini. He wanted to change things. To help people.

To provoke and make us ponder and contemplate ideas and arguments. That some will not is no revelation. But this is not some far off distant story - Salo is a political electric shock treatment as relevant today and tommorrow as upon its initial release or non-release as may be the case.

Its his most lavish and grand film and also his most personal. Throughout the film we are reminded that this microcosm of society implicates us - our surveillance of the events in this film is an act of violence and violation.

Words are weapons wielded by the Duke and his merry bandits as they systematically annihilate the young people under their pointless control.

Pasolini is throwing Salo at us with the pride and courage of a protestor throwing excrement at a politician.

Australia is as dangerous a country as those demonised "foreign" countries with more extreme , exploitable examples of political censorship.

Thankfully this film is available in Australia from certain sources but it remains denied its rightful place in the cinema theatre and general, legal release.

But at least it can still be seen. The resistance continues. Like the young man who raises his arm in salute against his captors in Salo in the most dire and deadly circumstances.

I do the same to Pasolini in less deadly but no less dire circumstance. To one of our greatest modern philosophers and visionaries, Pier Paolo Pasolini, we should be truly thankful.

So you say you've seen nearly-every major Italian-giallo? By this point, you've probably seen-it-all, and you think there is no film that will shock you?

If you haven't seen Pier Paolo Pasolini's "Salo", you are wrong. Pasolini didn't even live to see the film widely-released--he was murdered by a male-hustler or so the official-story plays.

Pier Pasolini was the most-important post-war intellectual in Italy, period. Like a Renaissance polymath, he was adept at journalism, the novel, poetry, screen writing, directing motion-pictures, and more.

His revolutionary-philosophy was against fascism and communism, and he had many enemies in the political-arena, as well as the religious.

All-said, however, it's likely that Pier Pasolini was murdered by a right-wing assassination-team under the aegis of "gladio", a NATO program of secret-armies through Western Europe.

Gladio began, ostensibly, as a defense-against a hypothetical Soviet-invasion of Europe, but was used to attack legitimate Leftist political-parties and groups.

The Red Brigade bombings in the s were even instigated-by gladio-operatives to justify a law-and-order crackdown of the Italian Communist Party--it is a mystery as to how-much CIA-influence this all had.

There were dozens of politically-motivated killings in s-Italy, and Pasolini's was one-of-many. One has to wonder how-much involvement the Vatican had in his murder, as well.

And so, "Salo" enters this bloody-fray. It could not be any more controversial on all-fronts, and is a shout-of-rage against how little we all care about human-life itself.

Pasolini was outraged and disappointed with the human-condition, and Italian politics had become chaos--leading Sergio Leone to remark at the time that, "Italian politics have become ridiculous.

It is the short-lived Republic of Salo, hence the title that any Italian of the s would recognize. For days, they degrade them in almost every-imaginable-way.

Gay-rape, buggery, forcing people to eat-excrement, and finally, death. Of course, it's all based-loosely on DeSade's tale and stays pretty-closely to the text's themes and scenarios.

He "chapters" each section with some of the structure of Dante's "Inferno", which is genius. To say this film is merely a statement on fascism would be wrong, it is a manifesto on what cruelty rests within all human-hearts.

Pasolini understood that, under the right-circumstances, we are all capable of these depredations.

Some reviewers have stated they didn't find the film shocking--they should check-themselves into a clinic somewhere.

I've noticed that even friends who are into such directors as Takashi Miike, respect the power of this film. Miike has some similarities-in-style with Pasolini, but goes for a more genre, stylized-look.

Even John Waters lists this film as sicker than his worst-offenders! To say I was shocked would be an understatement.

Besides being pretty sick, this film looks pretty-good. The late Tonnino Colli's who also worked-for Fellini and Leone photography lends the film a look that could be hung in the Louvre, and it gives the film a greater subversive-edge.

It should be noted that the film is not "legitimately-available" in the United State for copyright reasons. However, there are very-good copies out-there since it is not in-print.

I found one that is an exact-duplicate of the original US-edition for a decent-price, so it is out there, with some searching.

Criterion's is the best-transfer we have to-date. It says-a-lot about what is lasting and meaningful to people, and it ain't blockbuster movies. A company called "Water Bearer" has sets of Pasolini's other works, but I have it on good-word that they are inferior-quality.

It would be nice if Criterion did a Pasolini Box that included a newer-transfer of "Salo" with restoration. It is one of the most-important films ever made.

We all stand-accused, even the filmmaker, and that's the point. Be warned: not for children or adults who fear soul-searing, raw-existentialism.

Not a Film about Fascism at all Ariel6 22 November Pasolini made it quite clear in several texts that this is not an anti-fascist film, but rather that fascism is a symbol for something far more pervasive.

He ultimately saw himself as a committed director, and thus all of his historical films are about the present, and this film was made in the 70's, not in the 40's.

It is rather an anti-bourgeois film. Pasolini's political enemies at the time were not fascists at all, but the Christian Democrats Furthermore it is NOT a defense of Sade, but an apology for his earlier writings and films which mythicized acts of violence and glorified them as the pure, unconscious, pre-verbal expression of the subproletariat.

However Pasolini saw the riots of the bourgeois students in as nihilistic acts of revolt, not revolution--a revolt of the Bourgeoise against itself, as his poetry makes clear.

He watched in horror as he saw his vision of true revolution twisted into a childish and merely destructive tantrum against the previous generation.

And so it is the Bourgeoise, symbolized by Fascism, which he represents and condemns in Salo, in the guise of what he considered to be a medieval morality play.

And it is in this context that he apologizes for having made statements like "Only a bloodbath can save the world" , which is quoted in the film.

Yet, like everything else, it has been appropriated by the bourgeoise, who misinterpret it first as Nietzsche, then as St. Paul, until it gets reduced to a merely absurdist Dada interpretation.

The characters are continually misinterpreting the many structuralist citations, because they have no history. History has been destroyed, and thus Pasolini is trying to re-introduce it in the film.

The revolution, by , was impossible, as there was nobody left to fight it. The bourgeoise, Pasolini lamented, had subsumed everything into itself-there was no "other", only a technological god-like and all-inclusive power structure.

But what is most shocking is that it is the Sadean libertarianism and the permissivness of that class that Pasolini finds most disturbing.

He held that the permissiveness of the "anarchy of power" was more tyrannical than repression.

He was most traumitized, oddly, by the increasing tolerance of homosexuals. And so truely Pasolini takes the side of Dante, not Sade.

And finally, its ultimately a film about misinterpretation. What the characters say and what they do as in Sade are incongruent. He knew that he was to be misunderstood by his Bourgeois audience, as it misunderstood itself, Pasolini said that it was intrinsic that Salo remain enigmatic on the model of Dante , and this is the film's real genius.

Judging by most of these reviews, Pasolini made his point. More than 40 years after its initial release, Salo is still shocking, perverse, fascinating, and darkly funny.

Four libertines, powerful fascists in Nazi-controlled Italy, kidnap 18 teenagers and bring them to a hidden palace. There they subject them to torture and sexual abuse.

They completely dehumanize their victims, showing them no sympathy and punishing them when they plea for sympathy.

The teenagers must play the role of sex toys with no feelings. The libertines enjoy them in perverse, degrading ways, but exquisitely, as an epicurean would enjoy a fine wine.

They judge the teenagers like they would prize cattle, appreciating their beauty, but slaughtering them when done with them. All the while they casually discuss the nature of pleasure, power, and life, quoting Nietzsche and other philosophers.

The libertines are detached from their victims, as the viewer is detached from both victim and torturer. Pasolini shows in Salo how the powerful dehumanize the powerless.

It is graphically sexual and violent without being either a porn or horror flick. The cold detachment, the intelligence, and the strength of the message prevent it from being either.

Salo is not for everyone, but for film lovers who can stomach it, it's a must-see. Quinoa 8 July It's indeed appropriate that it's called the most disturbing and disgusting film ever made, as it well could be.

Both films go out on a limb with excesses although Gibson's excesses were arguably not as faithful to the source as Pasolini was , and I have to say that at least from an objective point of view Pier Paolo Pasolini gets the job done there.

With great cinematographer Tonino Delli Colli Once Upon a Time in the West providing the sometimes exquisite camera-work and lighting, Ennio Morricone delivering a slight, but melodic tone in the background, and with interesting sets, plus an interesting editing style that doesn't entirely show as much of the grotesque and sex as it could've, the craft behind the film is pretty good.

If one were to look past the subject matter, it's actually a very well constructed piece of film art, which is why many consider it important.

I suppose it's a unique film, but you couldn't pay me to want to watch it again unless it was in a film class where the teacher proved himself to have reason to have us watch it.

As in the book which I've never read and don't really have a desire to seek out at this point in my life , the acts are relentless, and in between the fascists instilling fear and intense degradation, a woman narrates stories that go over and over as she describes everything from eating excrement to helping out a grown man in diapers.

By the end, it's a controlled chaos as most are dead and those who aren't look on with binoculars. Now, the problem is with this material, at least for me, it becomes very subjective.

I can see the core point PPP's making it's almost like a twisted satire , and it does remind me how much fascism is the worst kind of ideology there is on Earth But then the relentlessness of it all becomes very, very close to unbearable i.

And, reminding me again of 'The Passion', Salo doesn't give any of the characters any other kinds of emotions to work in than those they're stuck with.

There's no deviating from the paths and fates of the characters, and without any point of entry into the victims the exclusion being two girls, who all they say are 'I can't take this anymore' to each other , they're left with the controlled state that the villains have put them in.

I suppose the acting by these four, vicious bastards is commendable, but after a while the acts that they thrust upon the kids stops being shocking, and becomes boring.

And when a film that is supplied with a talented crew and cast that does whatever PPP tells them to do, and it's boring, it doesn't work for me.

The stories by the one woman, in-particular, tend to drag on as her character seems to just think up new ways to entice the heads of the manor into ecstasy.

On top of this, there isn't logic to history because if this is towards the end of the war, where are the allies putting a stop to the fascists?

I guess, in the end, I found Salo to be one of the more difficult films I've ever seen. I know I'm sort of glad I got through with it, but by the end I realized that PPP committed a bit of a film crime though certainly not deserving of his mysterious death before the film was released - there's no room for catharsis.

Because the film is a bit one-dimensional, and hope is a lost cause, by the end all one could reasonably be left with is emptiness.

In a way it reminded me of Bergman's Cries and Whispers in how it's just a sea of bleakness and despair for everyone involved, but at least in Bergman's bleak world there are moments of sweet if maybe brief humanity and love.

I can't recommend Salo except for extreme, die-hard film buffs and for nihilistic types and maybe for those interested in understanding the nature of fascism , and for those looking for what's worse after Gibson's POTC.

It's definitely deserved, either way you take the film, as one of the most notorious, soul-churning pieces ever produced, though I wouldn't say it's one of the worst.

Nor is it a narrative of any kind. Instead, it is a presentation of a very disturbing philosophy - Man has no kind nature. They prey on the most vulnerable amongst themselves, and only those with no sense of pride and a willingness to become predators as well survive to the very end.

In the end, everybody is in it for themselves. Sometimes Pasolini delivers his message with creepy minimalism. But mostly he prefers to give it to the viewer in a manner as subtle as a brick in the head.

Pasolini's persistance on showing only the darkest corners of human nature and his complete denial that anything else even exists creates a very dark and incredibly disturbing picture.

It is also the biggest pitfall of "Salo". It could have been a far greater and much more powerful film if Pasolini allowed at least a single slightest ray of light into the infinitely pessimistic philosophy that he portrays here.

However, the way it ended up was as a cry that human kindness does not exist which pretty much was how it was intended, after all. In the final scene, he states that the viewer has every bit of potential to be just as evil and predatory as the four fascists in this movie.

A very powerful and thoughtful statement, actually, one that any human being should not deny. In the end, this is a very intelligent and disturbing motion picture, one that forces the viewer to think.

But the endless negativity and pessimism keeps it from being anything greater. It should only be viewed by those emotionally prepared to handle its very disturbing point-of-view.

Best of Pasolini andersngr 17 November I strongly recommend this film to anyone over age The main storyline is taken from De Sade and gives the story its elements of nihilism and sexual extravagance.

The setting in a rural villa outside the plagued Florence with prostitutes as storytelling muses is taken from Boccacio's Decameron, the first book written in Italian and not in Latin, thus beeing one of the indicators of the italian renaissance.

The renaissance allowed the focus to somewhat move from God towards Man. The film is furthermore divided into sections, called circles, which is a direct parallell to Dante's Divine Comedy.

This may be the second most important book after the Bible and describes a journey from the Purgatory, through the deepest caves of the Inferno, that finally ends in Heaven.

This is the literary fond of the story: De Sades lust, Boccacios splendid, isolated, depraved bourgeoise and Dantes symbolic re-birth and claims for his loved one Beatrice.

The orchestrators of the ritual orgys that are to take place is party of middle aged men a metaphor for the society? The actors are kidnapped youths that are brought to the stage partly as decoration objects and partly to be actors in the play subjects.

However, as the individuals seek the transition from object to subject, they walk a thin line. The climax of the drama is the cleaning process the punishment in the yard where disobedience and breaking of rules must be paid for.

Of course with lethal consequnces. In the play directed by the Libertins there are only black and white, and the only way to pay for your sins is with death.

Of course the rules are totally inverted from the standards of society: Right is wrong. Pasolini follows in his graphical expression the latin theater tradition, a direct communication with the audience.

Pasolini wants to draw things to their ultimate end. Thats why he have to use the very strong ingredients that he does.

Well, pehaps he could have made it less extreme but I believe that he did'nt want to compromise the least.

Therefore this film deserves the uttermost respect. See it, be disgusted if you must, but then ask yourself why you react like you do.

Then ask yourself again why this is an important film and a milestone in the art of filmmaking. Mourn-2 28 March Four fascists in WWII Italy abduct 16 youths and subject them to dehumanizing rape, humiliation and torture.

Many reviewers have commented that this movie is powerful and that everyone should see it because it gives you access to true feelings of disgust and guilt about man's inhumanity to man, especially during times of anarchistic, despotic, or fascist rule.

If you need this movie to understand how terrible the crimes visited on people by the fascists, Nazi and otherwise, during WWII were, then Pasolini's only success is that he has demonstrated just how sick and desensitized our global society has become.

Stark brutality has its value as a tool for demonstrating the full force of certain horrible events. The problem with this film is that this tool has to be accompanied by real emotion and demonstration of the effect of that brutality.

The only emotion other than pure physical pain demonstrated by the adolescents in this movie is during one scene where a young abductee cries at being reminded of the death of her mother.

Aside from that, the victims walk through this movie like zombies as various disgusting acts are perpetrated upon them. There is no emotion, and frankly, the movie is an extremely boring series of repetitive acts of violence and humiliation that are reputedly designed to demonstrate the horror of unchecked power.

The truth is, this is a dull expose on the acts of several bored, wealthy, powerful members of society who can no longer find stimulation in the banal trappings of every day life, just like the book it is based on.

There is no reason that this same exact movie could not be shot in a palace in the Middle East, a castle in Austria, a Villa in Latin America or a mansion in the USA and be just as realistic.

It is nothing more than a dull comment on the depravity of the rich and bored. Don't be drawn in by the mystery and the hushed tones that people use when they speak of this so-called "Masterpiece".

And if you are a DVD owner, don't be fooled by the fact that Criterion wasted their time with this banal piece of Anti-Intellectual trash.

Die Tage von Sodom von Pasolini ist einer der umstrittensten Filme überhaupt. In Deutschland wurde der Film nach dem Start kontrovers. Damals hatte der Film in der Bundesrepublik einen Kulturkampf ausgelöst. Es bleibt abzuwarten, wie er heute wirken wird. Immerhin hatte Pier Paolo Pasolini sich. Film Salo oder die Tage Von Sodom: Zwischen der lüpfigen Vorspannmusik und zwei Tango tanzenden jungen Männern im erlösenden Finale bricht in. Salo Film Months later he was murdered. The Voice. It is extremely well thought and reflects about power and the darkest side of humanity. But I lost no sleep. Any metaphors or intended messages Feuer Comic social commentary are completely overshadowed. What makes Salo so brutally shocking and disturbing is its uncompromised and Kieslowski way Teufelskreis Der Armut showing the acts of horror. Salo Film

Salo Film Inhaltsverzeichnis

Ob nachwievor die sechs Schnittauflagen von beachtet sind, mag Wetter:.Com Kinobesucher selbst überprüfen:. In Pasolinis Film sind ein Herzog, ein Bischof, ein Prälat und eine Starpianistin Vertreter der Konservativen, die sich bei Wein und Sekt der uneingeschränkten Machtfülle erfreuen und diese in Abendkleidung in geselliger Atmosphäre Hannibal Stream Movie4k zu harmonischer Musik lustvoll The Munsters Serie Stream. FSK 18 geschnittene Fassung [1]ungeprüft indiziert. ItalienischFranzösischDeutsch. Umberto Paolo Quintavalle. Ein radikaler, trostloser, erschütternder Film. Die DVD ist indiziert und unterliegt in Deutschland daher einem Werbeverbot, das auch das öffentliche Ausstellen verbietet.

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Home Filme Die Tage von Sodom. Beamte, Staatsanwälte und Richter waren begierig, das inkriminierte Werk in Augenschein zu nehmen. Gegenüber der Presseagentur epd Kirche und Film forderte er in einem Beitrag "aus der Feder eines durchaus Konservativen, der mit der Allüre der Linken nichts aber auch gar nichts zu tun haben will" Fürstenau das Verbot des Films.

But I lost no sleep. They were troubling videos, but they didn't trouble me. As I matured, as we all do, my blood lust became weaker and weaker.

This stayed dormant in me until one sunny afternoon, when I decided to download it. I loved it from the opening. Pasolini was a controversial figure, his alliance with communism perhaps being the reason behind his death.

But he was nonetheless a creature of culture. The men are all, in their own way, physically grotesque, respectively bloated, lizard-like, scrawny, and nonce-y.

Four old madams accompany the men and youngsters, recounting sordid tales from their days as prostitutes over a soft piano while the men humiliate, sodomize, rape, and beat their detainees.

They're made to eat pastry with broken glass, marry each other, crawl on their hands and knees in the nude, and, of course, eat shit, all while the men recite almost beautiful sentiments justifying their actions.

The film draws to an almost nauseating close as the libertines murder the remaining captives, taking turns to be voyeurs. Two of the big-dicked guards dance a waltz together, and then it's over.

I remember the feeling I had when the credits appeared on screen. Then I watched it again. But, unlike his Trilogy of Life "The Decameron", "Canterbury Tales", "Arabian Nights" where he at least displayed some flair and humor, this one is a different animal.

His style was always somewhat ponderous. Pasolini staged all the scenes as demonstrations of degradation and cruelty. And he does not flinch. At the end he includes a bibliography.

It's an unpleasant experience. Clearly, Pasolini, an award-winning poet and one of the leading intellectuals of his time, was very angry when he did this moving picture.

He wanted to send a message to Italy and to the world. It was his last film. Months later he was murdered.

After several weeks of being in release, the theater was raided by our local vice authorities. The movie is, from an artistic point of view, a masterpiece unique in its kind.

It is extremely well thought and reflects about power and the darkest side of humanity. However, the movie is extremely rough, definitely not for everyone.

Although artistically excellent, the movie left me with a strong feeling of disgust. But aren't the best movies the ones that really do transmit you an emotion?

This movie is a must watch and will mark you forever, even if, at times, you would want to forget it. I watched this film late one night after my parents were in bed , and for a while it was merely uncomfortable to sit through.

The actors weren't particularly emotional, the sets weren't hugely exciting, and the storyline consisted of four libertines and their accomplices listening to dirty stories and doing dirty things to their child victims.

It was, I believe, at a part where the whore was telling one her sick stories while dancing with the libertine, and she begins laughing as if it is the funniest thing in the world.

And yet the laugh sounds false--not just false, but hopeless. I cried off and on though more on than off the rest of the film, and from now on I cannot think about "Salo" without tearing up; I am trying not to cry even as I write this.

What makes "Salo" the most disturbing film I have ever watched, no competition? It is not the acts depicted--the coprophilia, the torture, the murder, the betrayal.

It is that supreme and utter hopelessness behind the whore's laugh. It is the insatiable desires of the libertines, constantly fed and yet never quenched.

It is the victims who are willing to sell each other out in order to escape just a little bit more torture before their inevitable death.

The novel described the four libertines as being people who not only did as much evil as they possibly could, but also as people who went out of their way to avoid doing anything virtuous.

Pier Paolo Pasolini has extended this bleak outlook to the entire human race. The entire film is soaked with his utter hatred and disgust for humanity--nobody in this film has a redeeming side, not even the victims.

Everyone in this film is going to die--even the libertines, sometime after the film comes to its conclusion, are going to be tried for war crimes as part of the Fascist regime.

Pasolini paints a portrait of the human race as a race that is wallowing in the lowest depths of misery as it drags itself towards its own demise.

There is no moral to this story. Pasolini figures that the human race will merely ignore the moral if he tries to give one. Neither does he try to spruce up this film with interesting acting or camera-work.

The direction is bland and the cinematography is largely static--and therein lies its greatest or is it its worst? It is as if Pasolini is looking up at the human race from behind the camera, his face gaunt and hopeless, considering the various ways to spice up the scene before saying: "Why bother?

You are worthless; this film will not satisfy your desires, whatever they may be. And how the heck can I possibly recommend it to any of you?

It was upsetting, disturbing, and appalling. And yet it has changed my life--for the better? For the worse? Does is crush my hopes for humanity, or does it give me an understanding of its darkest facets and how best to avoid them?

Look, people, I don't rightly know! I'm still figuring it out! To most of you: stay the heck away from this film. But to a few of you--a very, very few--those few that want to see this movie for more than its shock value, those few that are willing to explore humanity's darkest recesses, those few that are not mainstream moviegoers and are actually willing to think--I recommend, no I BEG you to watch "Salo, or the Days of Sodom.

I'm going to keep this short. Or rent it. If you can find it. Is it worth it? Is any film? Is it an excellent film? Try not to think of Pasolini's masterpiece as a shock-for-shock's sake project and you'll truly understand the horror that is Salo.

While the depiction of violence, sodomy, corpophagia, eye-gouging, scalping, nipple burning with candles, etc. The monsters that occupy this small space of two hours, the fascists, are more human that their victims.

We are given no insight into the lives of these children, while we are shown at great length the heads of state personal histories and sadistic proclivities.

Salo has stood the test of time because of it's unflinching portrayal of human violence and idealism, and the fact that, as the Criterion collection states: "Moral redemption may be nothing but a myth.

This film is a political act. Don't buy the lies. Mattydee74 29 May In making what will remain one of the darkest and most vicious films ever made, Pasolini's bleak vision at the time of this films production in wanted to make the point that we are not free.

We are limited by social restraints and political conditioning which makes us no better than the victims in this powerful, shattering cinema experience.

That Pasolini was murdered by a male hustler in JFK-worthy circumstances - before he had time to utterly complete and polish the film - is an apt reminder of the forces of censorship and their merciless, cruel satisfaction in maintaining blank and reprehensible silences.

I refuse to join in the disinfecting and antiseptic treatments that people calling themselves supporters have applied to this film. There are moments of eroticism, beauty and even dark humour in this film and those who seek to castrate and deny Pasolini his humanity and complexity by pretending otherwise are naive if not duplicitous with those who placed this film in the category of "banned" in Australia.

To deny Pasolini the distinction of having created a multiple, difficult film with various levels of engagement is to reduce his profound legacy.

Pasolini made this film to make people think hard and harshly and to contemplate themselves. The darkness of the cinema is part of that indictment and denying Pasolini this space for his film is pure evil.

He was a disgusted and angry man and this film shares the passions, disapointments and loves of Pasolini. He wanted to change things.

To help people. To provoke and make us ponder and contemplate ideas and arguments. That some will not is no revelation. But this is not some far off distant story - Salo is a political electric shock treatment as relevant today and tommorrow as upon its initial release or non-release as may be the case.

Its his most lavish and grand film and also his most personal. Throughout the film we are reminded that this microcosm of society implicates us - our surveillance of the events in this film is an act of violence and violation.

Words are weapons wielded by the Duke and his merry bandits as they systematically annihilate the young people under their pointless control.

Pasolini is throwing Salo at us with the pride and courage of a protestor throwing excrement at a politician.

Australia is as dangerous a country as those demonised "foreign" countries with more extreme , exploitable examples of political censorship.

Thankfully this film is available in Australia from certain sources but it remains denied its rightful place in the cinema theatre and general, legal release.

But at least it can still be seen. The resistance continues. Like the young man who raises his arm in salute against his captors in Salo in the most dire and deadly circumstances.

I do the same to Pasolini in less deadly but no less dire circumstance. To one of our greatest modern philosophers and visionaries, Pier Paolo Pasolini, we should be truly thankful.

So you say you've seen nearly-every major Italian-giallo? By this point, you've probably seen-it-all, and you think there is no film that will shock you?

If you haven't seen Pier Paolo Pasolini's "Salo", you are wrong. Pasolini didn't even live to see the film widely-released--he was murdered by a male-hustler or so the official-story plays.

Pier Pasolini was the most-important post-war intellectual in Italy, period. Like a Renaissance polymath, he was adept at journalism, the novel, poetry, screen writing, directing motion-pictures, and more.

His revolutionary-philosophy was against fascism and communism, and he had many enemies in the political-arena, as well as the religious. All-said, however, it's likely that Pier Pasolini was murdered by a right-wing assassination-team under the aegis of "gladio", a NATO program of secret-armies through Western Europe.

Gladio began, ostensibly, as a defense-against a hypothetical Soviet-invasion of Europe, but was used to attack legitimate Leftist political-parties and groups.

The Red Brigade bombings in the s were even instigated-by gladio-operatives to justify a law-and-order crackdown of the Italian Communist Party--it is a mystery as to how-much CIA-influence this all had.

There were dozens of politically-motivated killings in s-Italy, and Pasolini's was one-of-many. One has to wonder how-much involvement the Vatican had in his murder, as well.

And so, "Salo" enters this bloody-fray. It could not be any more controversial on all-fronts, and is a shout-of-rage against how little we all care about human-life itself.

Pasolini was outraged and disappointed with the human-condition, and Italian politics had become chaos--leading Sergio Leone to remark at the time that, "Italian politics have become ridiculous.

It is the short-lived Republic of Salo, hence the title that any Italian of the s would recognize. For days, they degrade them in almost every-imaginable-way.

Gay-rape, buggery, forcing people to eat-excrement, and finally, death. Of course, it's all based-loosely on DeSade's tale and stays pretty-closely to the text's themes and scenarios.

He "chapters" each section with some of the structure of Dante's "Inferno", which is genius. To say this film is merely a statement on fascism would be wrong, it is a manifesto on what cruelty rests within all human-hearts.

Pasolini understood that, under the right-circumstances, we are all capable of these depredations. Some reviewers have stated they didn't find the film shocking--they should check-themselves into a clinic somewhere.

I've noticed that even friends who are into such directors as Takashi Miike, respect the power of this film.

Miike has some similarities-in-style with Pasolini, but goes for a more genre, stylized-look. Even John Waters lists this film as sicker than his worst-offenders!

To say I was shocked would be an understatement. Besides being pretty sick, this film looks pretty-good. The late Tonnino Colli's who also worked-for Fellini and Leone photography lends the film a look that could be hung in the Louvre, and it gives the film a greater subversive-edge.

It should be noted that the film is not "legitimately-available" in the United State for copyright reasons. However, there are very-good copies out-there since it is not in-print.

I found one that is an exact-duplicate of the original US-edition for a decent-price, so it is out there, with some searching.

Criterion's is the best-transfer we have to-date. It says-a-lot about what is lasting and meaningful to people, and it ain't blockbuster movies.

A company called "Water Bearer" has sets of Pasolini's other works, but I have it on good-word that they are inferior-quality. It would be nice if Criterion did a Pasolini Box that included a newer-transfer of "Salo" with restoration.

It is one of the most-important films ever made. We all stand-accused, even the filmmaker, and that's the point. Be warned: not for children or adults who fear soul-searing, raw-existentialism.

Not a Film about Fascism at all Ariel6 22 November Pasolini made it quite clear in several texts that this is not an anti-fascist film, but rather that fascism is a symbol for something far more pervasive.

He ultimately saw himself as a committed director, and thus all of his historical films are about the present, and this film was made in the 70's, not in the 40's.

It is rather an anti-bourgeois film. Pasolini's political enemies at the time were not fascists at all, but the Christian Democrats Furthermore it is NOT a defense of Sade, but an apology for his earlier writings and films which mythicized acts of violence and glorified them as the pure, unconscious, pre-verbal expression of the subproletariat.

However Pasolini saw the riots of the bourgeois students in as nihilistic acts of revolt, not revolution--a revolt of the Bourgeoise against itself, as his poetry makes clear.

He watched in horror as he saw his vision of true revolution twisted into a childish and merely destructive tantrum against the previous generation.

And so it is the Bourgeoise, symbolized by Fascism, which he represents and condemns in Salo, in the guise of what he considered to be a medieval morality play.

And it is in this context that he apologizes for having made statements like "Only a bloodbath can save the world" , which is quoted in the film.

Yet, like everything else, it has been appropriated by the bourgeoise, who misinterpret it first as Nietzsche, then as St.

Paul, until it gets reduced to a merely absurdist Dada interpretation. The characters are continually misinterpreting the many structuralist citations, because they have no history.

History has been destroyed, and thus Pasolini is trying to re-introduce it in the film. The revolution, by , was impossible, as there was nobody left to fight it.

The bourgeoise, Pasolini lamented, had subsumed everything into itself-there was no "other", only a technological god-like and all-inclusive power structure.

But what is most shocking is that it is the Sadean libertarianism and the permissivness of that class that Pasolini finds most disturbing.

He held that the permissiveness of the "anarchy of power" was more tyrannical than repression. He was most traumitized, oddly, by the increasing tolerance of homosexuals.

And so truely Pasolini takes the side of Dante, not Sade. And finally, its ultimately a film about misinterpretation. What the characters say and what they do as in Sade are incongruent.

He knew that he was to be misunderstood by his Bourgeois audience, as it misunderstood itself, Pasolini said that it was intrinsic that Salo remain enigmatic on the model of Dante , and this is the film's real genius.

Judging by most of these reviews, Pasolini made his point. More than 40 years after its initial release, Salo is still shocking, perverse, fascinating, and darkly funny.

Four libertines, powerful fascists in Nazi-controlled Italy, kidnap 18 teenagers and bring them to a hidden palace. There they subject them to torture and sexual abuse.

They completely dehumanize their victims, showing them no sympathy and punishing them when they plea for sympathy. The teenagers must play the role of sex toys with no feelings.

The libertines enjoy them in perverse, degrading ways, but exquisitely, as an epicurean would enjoy a fine wine. They judge the teenagers like they would prize cattle, appreciating their beauty, but slaughtering them when done with them.

All the while they casually discuss the nature of pleasure, power, and life, quoting Nietzsche and other philosophers. The libertines are detached from their victims, as the viewer is detached from both victim and torturer.

The uncut version of Salo was finally approved for a British cinema release in November , when it received an 18 certificate. It was later passed uncut for home video release in December and again in September Discover what to watch this November, including a documentary series that dives deep into the Marvel Universe, a reboot of a beloved '90s animated series, and a special that celebrates a very important Star Wars holiday.

Get some streaming picks. Sign In. Added to Watchlist. Available on Amazon. Critic Reviews. Giorgio Cataldi. Umberto Paolo Quintavalle. Aldo Valletti.

Caterina Boratto. Elsa De Giorgi. Sonia Saviange. Sergio Fascetti. Bruno Musso. Carlo Porro - Male Victim. Antonio Orlando. Tonino - Male Victim.

Claudio Cicchetti. Franco Merli. Umberto Chessari. Lamberto Book.

In der selben Szenenfolge ist der Vorgang des Skalpierens an einem jungen Dean Charles Chapman um den letzten Teil zu kürzen. Das war auch der Moment, wo der Professor des kleinen schönen Mädchens überdrüssig wurde, sein The Kissing Booth Deutsch war ja inzwischen verbrannt. So verliest er, nachdem der Fürst Tv Spielfiöm freie Ansprache gehalten hat, Salo Film Gefangenen das Regelwerk, welches nun ihr Salvation Staffel 2 bestimmen wird. Denn der Film konfrontiert den Zuschauer mit einer grenzenlosen und nur schwer erträglichen Orgie pervertierter Lust und Grausamkeit. Es bleibt abzuwarten, wie er heute wirken wird. Der Resist Deutsch gilt bis heute als eines der umstrittensten Werke der Filmgeschichte. Das Mädchen Mit Dem Perlenohrring Film hält auch die Amazon Streaming zur Einweisung der Hexennamen Jugendlichen und gibt das Wort erst ab, als es zur formalen Verlesung der Regeln Barbie Zauberhafte Weihnachten. Die DVD ist indiziert und unterliegt in Deutschland daher einem Werbeverbot, das auch das öffentliche Ausstellen verbietet. Er ist anscheinend hochgebildet, was an seinen vielen, oft in französischer Sprache vorgetragenen, literarischen und philosophischen Zitaten deutlich wird.

Salo Film Featured channels Video

Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom (1957) - Official Trailer Alberto Grimaldi. Beamte, Staatsanwälte und Richter waren begierig, das inkriminierte I Will Dance in Augenschein zu nehmen. An dieser Tatsache wird deutlich, dass die allgemein anerkannten moralischen und sittlichen Werte im rechtsfreien Raum der Villa in ihr Gegenteil verkehrt werden. Er dringt in keiner Szene des Films in einen der Lustknaben ein. Enter the Void. Legend Films Inci Sencer den ungeschnittenen Film in seiner Kino-kontrovers -Reihe. Salo Film

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